CRUISER RIDING TECHNIQUES

03rd May 2014 Technique

Riding motorcycles on the road can throw up some challenges. Gravel, oil, potholes, animals, texting drivers, the list goes on.

Making small corrections to your line or speed mid corner is generally not a big deal on most bikes and the majority of riders do this automatically without even realizing it.

Cruisers, however, are a little different.

Cruuiser 622 girl

Compared to the majority of bikes, cruisers are generally heavier, including an increased rearward weight distribution. Other traits include low ground clearance and reduced maneuverability due to steering geometry.

Thus changing line or braking mid turn on a cruiser can have more consequences compared to a sports bike.

VULCAN 622

This unforgiving nature of cruisers means these riders need to be doing it better than the masses.

Efficient use of the corner through good line selection should be maximized to give the cruiser rider more flexibility and options if road conditions change unexpectedly.

Body position too, can allow you to keep the motorcycle more vertical for a given corner and speed.

HD 622

Also, compared to a cruiser, a sports motorcycle pitches significantly more under brakes. This is important as weight transfer is a major contributor to braking performance. The vertical load on the front tire increases and this in turn pushes the rubber into the tarmac placing the main braking power with the front brake on most bikes.

On a cruiser however the pitching effect is reduced due to low and long nature of the bike rendering the front brake less efficient, placing more importance on including the rear brake.

Training, practice and experience are key to doing anything well. motoDNA have introduced a cruiser specific training course which teaches you how to get the most out of your machine and most importantly show you the techniques to safely negotiate your cruiser around any hazards that appear on the road.

Get motorcycle training with motoDNA